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20121201
20121231
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KQED (PBS) 8
KQEH (PBS) 6
KRCB (PBS) 2
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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Dec 5, 2012 4:00am PST
at a firm that was only a sliver of goldman's size. >> the firm's stock is getting crushed yet again this morning, and mf's credit rating was cut to junk by moody's overnight. >> how can something like this be allowed to happen? how can n e individu completely shape the destiny of this firm and ultimately its demise? >> these two stories on this special ededion ontline. >> frontline is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major funding is provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. and by reva and david logan, committed to investigative journalism as the guardian of the public interest. additional funding is provided by the park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. and by tfrontline journalism fund, supporting investigative reporting and enterprprprprprpp >> martin smith: it's one of america's most dangerous jobs. >> people have no idea what we go through on a day-to-day
PBS
Dec 11, 2012 10:00pm PST
we're tired. we got to be able to think when we're tired. >> narrator: at 3:30 pm on friday, the 13th of august, the heat index in little rock was 112 degrees. will james, a 16-year-old, 250-pound lineman for pulaski academy, began to falter. >> the team was doing up-downs, and will starts to stagger. and we ran from here over to here, and we caught him about right in here. ( siren wailing ) >> narrator: it was heat stroke. will was rushed to the icu at arkansas children's hospital. >> when he arrived to us, he was comatose and on the ventilator. initially, his kidneys were doing okay, but over the first 48 hours, they deteriorated, and he went into renal failure. his blood pressure was really low; it was in the 40s. his temperature was very high. he was obviously very critically ill. >> the waiting room was full of people there for will-- teammates, parents, coaches. there were media people roaming around, because not only had will collapsed from heat stroke; two days earlier, another child had, as well. >> narrator: the other boy was also a high school football player from a sm
PBS
Dec 18, 2012 10:30pm PST
traffickers' abuses. >> ( translated ): i hadn't encountered much evil in my life. i thought i'd find at least one kind person or that one of those pimps would set me free. ( accordion playing ) >> narrator: odessa, ukraine: a port town on the black sea known for its nightlife and its beautiful women. under the old soviet union, it was a center of organized crime. now odessa has become a major hub for the global sex trade. women are lured to the port of odessa from all over the struggling countries of eastern europe with promises of badly- needed work abroad. many are unaware of what the traffickers have in store. the production team has set up cameras here. >> we knew that if we wanted to get inside the story that we had to be in a place where it was so prevalent that everybody would have an example or know people who were trafficked. and that's what brought us ultimately to odessa. >> narrator: frustrated with an inability to chase the traffickers overseas, the ukrainian secret service has given us a tip about a suspected sex trader who regularly brings girls through here. across from
PBS
Dec 25, 2012 10:00pm PST
and in our second story tonight... >> at the beginning, i just isolated myself from everything and everyone. >> there is a national crisis in the nation's high-poverty middle schools. >> what if you could change te future for kids on a fast track to dropping out of school? >> it was imperative on my part as a homeroom teacher to discuss why she was coming in late. >> the fact the she believed in me, i believed in me. >> taking advantage of the "middle school moment." >> any school can use this system to keep kids on track. >> these two stories on this special edition frontline. >> frontline is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. major funding is provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world. more information is available at macfound.org. additional funding is provided by the park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. and by tfrontline journalism fund, supporting investigative reporting and enterprise journalism. major fu
PBS
Dec 23, 2012 9:00pm PST
any number of lethal objects at, no doubt, great losses to the army. >> narrator: josephus described the siege and its aftermath: >> ( dramatized ): the romans expected to make an assault upon the fortress, which they did. but they saw nobody but a terrible solitude on every side, as well as a perfect silence. >> the irony, of course, is that when the soldiers breached the wall, finally, it was not they who had been subject to the suicide attack, it was those who had been guarding masada who had committed suicide. >> narrator: according to josephus, the defenders had killed themselves rather than submit to the romans. but modern archeologists have found little evidence of mass suicide among the ruins. what really happened there remains a mystery. but josephus' version of the story turned masada into the powerful symbol of a noble failure. >> the failure of the first revolt really was a traumatic event for everyone living in the jewish homeland, jews and christians alike. as a result, they had to start rethinking some of their own assumptions. when jerusalem was destroyed, a
PBS
Dec 4, 2012 5:00am PST
, diphtheria, polio and more. >> if you look at vaccines over the past hundred years, they've increased our life span by 30 years. >> but today, some americans question if all those vaccines are worth the risk. >> and i said, "why am i supposed to vaccinate my newborn baby against a sexually transmitted disease," and the nurse got really mad. >> and some parent groups attack vaccines as the cause of chronic diseases from adhd to autism. >> my kid got six vaccines in one day, and he regressed. >> would i rather have the measles versus autism? we'll sign up for the measles. >> despite numerous scientific studies that say vaccines are safe, public concern persists. the result: outbreaks ofr a gen >> we are not living in a bubble. it's just a matter of time before someone brings that disease into our community. >> as public health officials struggle to communicate with a skeptical public, they face a radically changed social media environment where youtube videos spread virally across the internet. >> a regular flu shot gone horribly wrong. >> these people were much more likely to believe somet
PBS
Dec 20, 2012 9:00pm PST
, committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world. more information is available at macfound.org. additional funding is provided by the park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. and by the frontline journalism fund, with grants from jon and jo ann hagler, on behalf of the jon l. hagler foundation. and scott nathan and laura debonis. >> my name is brittany smith, and i'm nine years old. it's tough because my mom and dad are poor. my dad just lost his job. it's kind of hard for us. monday i tried getting in the shower, and it was cold. i put the hot on all the way and no cold, and it was freezing. it felt like shoving your face in a bunch of snow. it was freezing! the hot water shut off because we didn't pay the bill in time. it was overdue. >> so what's the next bill due? >> electricity. it's going to be $318. we just need to put roger's ass to work. >> yeah. >> when you see the flat-screen tv and the computers and our ps3 and stuff, that's just things we've acquired over the years, stuff that we've had before all this happened, li
PBS
Dec 27, 2012 9:00pm PST
world. more information is available at macfound.org. additional funding is provided by the park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. and by the frontline journalism fund, supporting investigative reporting and enterprise journalism. additional funding for this program was provided by the arthur vining davis foundations. >> ( choir singing ) >> "the angel gabriel was sent from god to a city of galilee named..." >> narrator: every sunday, in every corner of the world... >> "...the virgin, betrothed to a man whose name..." >> narrator: ...people gather to hear a story. >> "...and the virgin's name was mary." >> narrator: for more than 2,000 years, that story has been told and retold. >> "...and to bear a son." >> narrator: along the way, each generation has found in its telling its own meaning and interpretation. >> "'...you shall call his name jesus...'" >> narrator: that story, of a man called jesus of nazareth, a man who became jesus christ, was originally told by his first followers... >> "'...and be called the son of the most high.'" >> nar
WETA
Dec 18, 2012 10:30pm EST
at the way the earliest christians themselves thought about jesus, by the way they kept his memory alive, by the way that they told the story. >> narrator: central to the story is the fact that jesus was born a subject of the roman empire. >> ( dramatized ): and in those days, a decree went out from caesar augustus that all the world should be taxed. >> jesus was born during the reign of the emperor augustus in the sort of a booming economy of the pax romana, the roman peace. and on every coin that augustus had were the words, divi filius, "son of the divine one"-- julius caesar-- son of god. >> this is on every billboard in the mediterranean world. he is the savior of the world, and he brings the peace. now, you may have scruples about how he brings the peace, but he brings peace to rome. and as the saying goes in latin, "peace to the rome and quiet to the provinces." >> ( dramatized ): this is he, augustus caesar, son of a god, who shall restore the golden age and spread his empire. >> narrator: rome's empire spread across the mediterranean, sweeping through north africa and reac
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)